Trials of New Medicines

New Survey Notes Iowa Patients Willing to Consider Participating in Trials of New Medicines

01.10.14 | By Jeff Trewhitt

Those who advocate more aggressive outreach to patients to talk about the potential benefits and importance of clinical research would certainly have felt vindicated during the roll out of "Research in Your Backyard: Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials in Iowa" yesterday in Des Moines.

The results of a new University of Iowa Institute for Clinical and Translational Science survey show patients are willing to consider participating in clinical trials of new medicines if only someone would explain why they should. The survey of 743 Iowans with chronic diseases shows almost two-thirds might be willing to participate as clinical trial patients and 60 percent said they would like their health care providers to tell them about clinical trials available in Iowa.

When asked what might sway them to participate in clinical research, 77 percent said the reputation of the institutions conducting the trials, 74 percent said access to first-rate care, 71 percent said access to health care specialists and 66 percent said the advice of health care providers would help them decide.

Clinicians in Iowa have responded to patient interest in learning more about clinical research by forming the Iowa Coalition of Clinical Researchers (ICCR), which was introduced yesterday at a panel discussion and news conference attended by Iowa Governor Terry Branstad, Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds and the founders and partners of the ICCR.

The launch of a statewide clinical trial education campaign in Iowa is timely. The new "Research in Your Backyard" report shows the state has 141 trials of potential new chronic disease medicines that are still recruiting patients, including 77 for cancer, 32 for heart disease and 16 for diabetes.

To learn more about the ICCR and clinical trials in Iowa, visit www.phrma.org/innovation/research-in-your-backyard.

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