Week In Review: Engaging in Conversation on Key Issues

Pressing Health Care Questions and Heart Disease Report

06.28.13 | By Kaelan Hollon

This week, we launched our “Conversations” forum as part of our larger goal of engaging a broad spectrum of thinkers, patient advocates, providers and manufacturers on their thoughts about pressing health care questions. As Matt Bennett, our SVP of Communications, said, “No one organization has all the answers, so it’s important to bring together diverse contributors to weigh in.”

Heart disease is the number one killer in men and women, causing one in four deaths, according to the CDC. Thus finding a cure is vital. We released a new Medicines In Development report for heart disease this week, which outlines the 215 medicines in the pipeline that could save lives and give patients hope. If you're one of the millions affected by heart disease, or just curious about new medicines in development, it's worth a read.

This week, we also emphasized the importance of understanding the health challenges facing minorities. Josie Martin, our EVP of Public Affairs, discussed the unique challenges facing the LGBT community and emphasized that progress is being made to understand how to address them. She noted that the National Health Interview Survey for 2013, conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), will address barriers to health care such as sexual orientation and gender identity for the first time. Learning more about the needs of the LGBT community could provide new information that may ultimately help patients receive better treatment.

As our CEO John Castellani said, “We aren’t going to agree all the time, nor should we…[but] healthy debate is the foundation of progress and advancement.” That's why we consider these dialogues so essential to progress and innovation.

What health care issues you think need to be discussed? Check out the new “Conversations” forum often to see what health care experts think and weigh in.

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